Month: February 2021

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Russian state laboratory Vektor on Tuesday announced it was launching research into prehistoric viruses by analysing the remains of animals recovered from melted permafrost. The Siberia-based lab said in a statement that the aim of the project was to identify paleoviruses and conduct advanced research into virus evolution. The research in collaboration with the University
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Amid record cold temperatures and skyrocketing energy demand, utilities across the central US have ordered rolling blackouts to ration electricity, leaving millions of people without power. Energy expert Michael E. Webber explains why weather extremes can require such extreme steps. 1. The Plains states have a lot of wild weather. Why is this cold wave
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Do you think the referee always has it in for your team? What about a sneaking suspicion that aliens have already visited Earth?   “Everyone believes at least one conspiracy theory,” says sociologist Asbjørn Dyrendal from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU). “These examples activate the same mechanisms that come into play when our thoughts
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Cities don’t just have sea level rises to worry about – they’re also slowly sinking under the weight of their own development, according to new research, which emphasises the importance of factoring subsidence into models of climate change risk. Geophysicist Tom Parsons, from the United States Geological Survey (USGS) agency, looked at San Francisco as
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A new satellite image has captured the stunning white peaks of two volcanoes on the Big Island in Hawaii, which have experienced their second-most extensive snow coverage since current records began.  The high-resolution image – snapped on Feb. 6  by the Operational Land Imager (OLI) onboard the Landsat-8 satellite – shows the striking contrast between the snow-covered
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A high-production brewery believed to be the world’s “oldest” has been uncovered by a team of archaeologists at the Abydos funerary site in southern Egypt, the tourism ministry said Saturday. “The joint Egyptian-American archaeological mission, headed by Dr. Matthew Adams of New York University, and Dr. Deborah Vischak of Princeton University, working in North Abydos,
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Causality is one of those difficult scientific topics that can easily stray into the realm of philosophy.  Science’s relationship with the concept started out simply enough: an event causes another event later in time.  That had been the standard understanding of the scientific community up until quantum mechanics was introduced.  Then, with the introduction of the famous
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Just because you’re done with a Prozac pill, it doesn’t mean the pill is done. In fact, when you swallow something like an antidepressant, that’s not the end of the drug’s journey in the world. It’s the beginning. Most pharmaceutical drugs, including psychoactive medications such as fluoxetine (made famous under the Prozac brand), are only partially
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Artificial intelligence (AI) is learning more about how to work with (and on) humans. A recent study has shown how AI can learn to identify vulnerabilities in human habits and behaviours and use them to influence human decision-making. It may seem cliched to say AI is transforming every aspect of the way we live and
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Brilliantly blue beads from Europe unearthed by archaeologists in Arctic Alaska may predate Christopher Columbus‘ arrival in the New World, a new controversial study finds. These blueberry-size beads were likely created in Venice during the 15th century and then traded eastward, enduring a 10,500-mile (17,000 kilometer) land-based journey east across Eurasia and then boated across the