Environment

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Caught between rapidly expanding resource use and climate change-fuelled fires, the future of the Amazon rainforest and the stunning array of life teeming within it just keeps growing bleaker. In a new report for Environment: Science and Policy for Sustainable Development geologist Robert Toovey Walker from University of Florida reviews recent research on the Amazon
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The world’s (former) largest iceberg continues to break apart into smaller pieces on the doorstep of a major marine wildlife haven and home to millions of macaroni and king penguins in Antarctica.  This comes less than a week after the mammoth iceberg, known as A68a, first split in two, Live Science recently reported.  Scientists at the US National
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With global travel curtailed during the COVID-19 pandemic, many people are finding comfort in planning future trips. But imagine that you finally arrive in Venice and the “floating city” is flooded. Would you stay anyway, walking through St. Mark’s Square on makeshift catwalks or elevated wooden passages – even if you couldn’t enter the Basilica or
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Massive greenhouse gas reserves, frozen deep under the seabed, are alarmingly now starting to thaw. That’s according to an international team of scientists whose preliminary findings were recently reported in The Guardian. These deposits, technically called methane “gas hydrates”, are often described as “fiery ice” due to the parlour trick of burning atop a Bunsen burner
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Even if humanity stopped emitting greenhouse gases tomorrow, Earth will warm for centuries to come and oceans will rise by metres, according to a controversial modelling study published Thursday. Natural drivers of global warming – more heat-trapping clouds, thawing permafrost, and shrinking sea ice – already set in motion by carbon pollution will take on
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Shellfish such as scallops, mussels, and oysters – bivalve molluscs – readily take up tiny specs of metals into their tissues and shells. In sufficient concentrations, this can harm their growth and survival chances, and even threaten the health of any human who eats their contaminated meat. Such shellfish provide one-quarter of the world’s seafood,
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US President Donald Trump’s administration on Thursday removed endangered species protections for the gray wolf, paving the way for the iconic predator to be more widely hunted. The move was slammed by conservation groups, which said that while wolf numbers have partly recovered since the animal was first listed in 1974, they remain “functionally extinct”
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Rapid melt is reshaping coastal Greenland, potentially altering the human and animal ecosystems along the country’s coast.  New research published in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface on Oct. 27 finds that the ice retreat in Greenland has changed the way glaciers flow and where they dump into the sea. These changes could impact ice loss from
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Agricultural department workers wearing protective suits have eradicated the first nest of giant “murder hornets” discovered in the United States, vacuuming them out of a tree in Washington state. The nest of Asian giant hornets was found on Thursday by Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) entomologists on a property in Blaine, near the border
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Scientists think they’ve finally come closer to identifying the cause of Earth’s worst mass extinction, by tracking down the geochemical trigger that may have started it all. Known as the Great Dying, the Permian-Triassic extinction event happened around 252 million years ago. The new research is based on a study of fossil shells left behind by clam-like
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From a pile of seaweed to a packet of soy sauce. The London startup Notpla has created a plastic alternative from seaweed that’s biodegradable – and even edible. And it’s hoping it could put a dent in the 300 million tons of plastic waste humans generate each year.  Notpla’s natural plastic-like casing is biodegradable within four to six weeks,